Tag Archive for wwdc

A Swift Softening

enter image description here Listeners to last week’s Coder Radio know that during the live feed WWDC coverage, I was less than enthused with the announcement of Swift, Apple’s new programming language for iOS and OS X. My initial reaction was based on the somewhat unclear way they announced Swift; it was not very clear what they wanted us developers to use Swift for and that led me to the wrong conclusion that Swift is designed to be a near to medium term 100% replacement for Objective-C – this simply is not the case. So far, I’ve read through the Swift book on iBooks and the documentation publicly available twice and found something very surprising – Swift reminds of QML in QT.

This might sound a bit odd, given that in a lot of significant ways Swift and QML are very different languages, but they actually share a kindred spirit and will likely take the same place in my tool-chain – layouts. Yes, both Swift and QML are technically capable of so much more than layouts but really they are both well suited for that task in particular. Why do you think the WWDC demo was so UI / visuals heavy?

So the bottom line is no I don’t hate Swift and no I don’t think it will be the end of Apple development as we know it. And yes, I will be using it but, at least for the next year or so, in the same capacity as QML and its relationship with Objective-C will be same as QML’s with C++ in my QT code-bases.

Questions? Comments? Find me on Twitter.

WWDC 2014 Predictions

WWDC 2014

Well, it is that time of year again – when the tech space goes crazy with Apple fever and starts to have dancing iTVs and iWatches in their heads. From the Apple developer perspective, this is (like the WWDC of 2012) being preceded by increasing frustrations from the community regarding Apple’s tools but more their practices – these complaints have been grumbling under the surface and indeed I’ve been at the forefront of sounding the alarm, but some fights have already been lost and if history is any indicator the prominent Apple devs will be placated by pretty much whatever they get on Monday. Still, to be fair, if Apple could address a few core areas of developer pain, then there would be legitimate cause to celebrate.

Contracts / Intents: Windows Phone and Android both have viable solutions to interapp communication that work very well for the developer communities on those platforms, the platform vendors, and of course the end user. iOS, however, has no real solution to this problem; I don’t consider and a reasonable person would probably agree that the current URL schemes tricks are all just really sloppy hacks that should never be shipped and no sane developer would use them by choice if there were a better alternative. There is no technical reason that this can’t be done and at this point Apple’s stubbornness is doing a huge disservice to the developer community and the end user.

App Test Distribution: One of the most annoying aspects of being an Apple developer is that whenever a customer or even a teammate gets a new iOS device, we have to go through the whole rigmarole of getting the devices UUID, adding the UUID to our developer portal, regenerating a provisioning profile, and making making a whole new binary just to get that one new device into the testing pool. This is absurd. Apple for good reasons wants to limit how apps are distributed outside of the App Store but at this point, there system is too much of an inconvenience to developers (a group I strongly feel is important to their long-term success) to be tolerated one day longer. There is some hope – a few months ago Apple purchased Testflight and that suggests that they intend to streamline the test distribution system.

Mac Mini Refresh: I’ve been careful not to put oo many consumer / new product requests in these sort of posts but I am willing to make an exception for the Mac Mini. Though the mini is probably the least sexy device that Apple sells, it is extremely important for the developer community at large, as a ton of little shops are almost 100% Mac Mini shops. At this point, it is pretty hard to justify the purchase of a Mini given how old the tech in the device is and the somewhat poor value proposition – at least compared with the iMac or an equivalent Windows PC.

That’s it. I don’t think these items are too crazy but am not so sure that we are going see anything of significance in any of these areas. My guess is that we will see nothing the way of interapp communication, a half step toward an easier test distribution, and little more than a spec bump or price drop on the Mini.

If you want to troll me when I inevitably proven wrong on Monday, then please follow me on Twitter.

WWDC 2012 Keynote Let Down

Earlier today I hosted Coder Radio with Chris Fisher of Jupiter Broadcasting and in the episode we discussed my reactions as a developer to the WWDC keynote this year (2012). First things first. I did not attend WWDC nor have I installed the iOS 6.0 developer release, so some of my information may be incomplete; I have to do this in this way due to Apple’s developer NDA. You can listen to the show to hear what I didn’t like, but I’d rather go through a few things that I would like to have seen that to my knowledge aren’t coming.

Inter-app Communications
This is by far my largest pet peeve with iOS development and using iOS. Why isn’t there are robust way for apps to work together and share data; within reason of course. Android has a version this in the form of “intents” and Windows Phone 7 has a incredibly powerful system called “contracts”. This really gets to me when I consider that iOS is a BSD system yet does not adhere to the UNIX philosophy of allowing many small applications to work together to do big things; yes, I know that iOS apps tend to be smaller in scope than their desktop counterparts but to date there is no real way for them to work together. There is so much functionality that cannot easily be done on iOS due to this restriction.

Widgets
On my Android and Windows phone I can glance at the screen and get the latest tweets, view other data (such as a stock ticker), and play a song, or begin or pause listening to an audiobook. On iOS, almost all of those things require me to launch separate apps. That’s silly not to mention a bad user experience. I know there are definitely battery life concerns if you have too many widgets open, but there is no reason that Apple can’t add some sort of restricted mode for simple widgets to run in.

Siri integration
Ever since I got my hands on my 4S I have been waiting for a full Siri API. Apple has been working on it, but to date there is no fully functional Siri API for third party developers. This is understandable given how often Siri simply does not work but it is still a shame.

That’s all for now. Now I can finally take a look at the dev preview! For feedback please find me on Google+ or Twitter.